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The Myth Of Quetzalcoatl: Religion, Rulership, And History In The Nahua World Mobi Download Bookl UPD


The Myth Of Quetzalcoatl: Religion, Rulership, And History In The Nahua World Mobi Download Bookl === https://blltly.com/2tvBq6



The Myth Of Quetzalcoatl: Religion, Rulership, And History In The Nahua World Mobi Download Bookl UPD


The Myth of Quetzalcoatl: A Review of Alfredo LÃpez Austin's Book


Quetzalcoatl is one of the most fascinating and complex figures in Mesoamerican mythology and history. He has been variously portrayed as a god, a priest, a king, a hero, a trickster, and a foreigner. His name, which means "feathered serpent" in Nahuatl, evokes both his divine and human aspects. But who was Quetzalcoatl really And what does his myth reveal about the Nahua world view and culture


In his book The Myth of Quetzalcoatl: Religion, Rulership, and History in the Nahua World, Alfredo LÃpez Austin offers a comprehensive and insightful analysis of the origins, development, and meanings of Quetzalcoatl's myth. Drawing on a wide range of sources, including pre-Hispanic codices, colonial chronicles, archaeological evidence, and modern ethnography, LÃpez Austin traces the evolution of Quetzalcoatl's myth from its pre-Columbian roots to its post-conquest transformations. He argues that Quetzalcoatl's myth is not a simple or static story, but a dynamic and multifaceted one that reflects the Nahua's changing historical circumstances and cultural values.


LÃpez Austin begins by examining the earliest references to Quetzalcoatl in the pre-Hispanic period, when he was mainly associated with the wind, the rain, and the creation of life. He then explores how Quetzalcoatl became a prominent figure in the Toltec civilization, where he was revered as a priest-king who brought civilization and arts to his people. He also discusses how Quetzalcoatl's myth was influenced by foreign elements, such as Teotihuacan's Feathered Serpent and Maya's Kukulkan. He then moves on to the post-Toltec period, when Quetzalcoatl's myth was adopted and adapted by different Nahua groups, such as the Chichimecs, the Aztecs, and the Tlaxcalans. He shows how Quetzalcoatl's myth served various political and religious purposes for these groups, such as legitimizing their rulership, expressing their identity, or challenging their enemies.


LÃpez Austin also examines how Quetzalcoatl's myth was affected by the Spanish conquest and colonization of Mexico. He explains how Quetzalcoatl's myth was used by both the Nahua and the Spaniards to make sense of the new historical reality. He analyzes how Quetzalcoatl's myth was manipulated by some Nahua leaders to justify their alliance with the Spaniards or their resistance against them. He also explores how Quetzalcoatl's myth was interpreted by some Spaniards to identify him with Saint Thomas or Christ or to demonize him as an idol or a devil. He concludes by discussing how Quetzalcoatl's myth has survived and evolved in modern times, inspiring various artistic, literary, religious, and political movements.


LÃpez Austin's book is a remarkable contribution to Mesoamerican studies. It is not only a thorough and rigorous study of Quetzalcoatl's myth, but also a rich and nuanced portrait of the Nahua world view and culture. It is written in an engaging and accessible style that will appeal to both scholars and general readers. It is also enhanced by numerous illustrations that complement the text. The Myth of Quetzalcoatl: Religion, Rulership, and History in the Nahua World is a must-read for anyone interested in Mesoamerican mythology and history. aa16f39245